Summer on a Shoestring


August 2, 2014, 11:19 pm
Filed under: Cooking in the white house, Recreation

By: Hannah Babel, Miami University

Since the summer is coming to a close and my family is visiting this upcoming weekend, the past weekend was my last with the shoestring crew. This summer here has been an amazing one, filled with simply splendid people and spectacular sights. And to start to wrap things up, I could not have asked for a better week/weekend.

After a very long couple of weeks in the field and lab sampling and processing our soil samples, the hustle and bustle finally slowed down just in time for our science night to learn all about the up and coming NEON project in Bartlett. NEON stands for the National Ecological Observatory Network. The corporation is still in the construction phase, but we had two speakers (including a former shoestringer) that are part of the Bartlett Experimental Forest site come to share with us what they are all about.

The following morning we all woke ourselves up at the crack of dawn so we could leave Bartlett by 6:45 and head to Hubbard Brook for a tour that the one and only Don Buso was going to give us on the experimental watersheds. It was a wonderful day to hike around Hubbard Brook, but despite seeing all there was there, the most exciting part of the day was having Don share a bit of his knowledge with us. That man captured us all with his stories of history and science and most of all his enthusiasm about the work that has been done there and what we are learning.

Don Buso

      The man himself, Don Buso.

The weekend finally rolled around and Friday night everyone seemed a bit tired so we all took naps. Some of us were out for the night, but then some of us woke back up and played some board games. Shinjini and Adam had their hand at Uno while Eli and I picked up some ice cream, played Pirateers with Donny, and took a stroll down the tracks to the Saco. If I had known what was going to be in store for me for the next day, I would not have gotten back up and slept through the night; but then again, sometimes you have to sacrifice a little sleep to make the most of every minute in a place like this. (So I guess it was worth it).

Saturday morning I woke up with a text from Soph asking if I was up for hiking Washington that day (they were planning on hiking it Sunday since Eli hadn’t summited it yet). I said “Let’s do it!” And off we were. Since Justin and I had hiked up Tuckerman’s earlier in the summer, a different path up the mountain sounded more exciting to us. Soph suggested Huntington’s Ravine since it seemed to be just a little steeper and we heard it had spectacular views. Immediately the trail was much more fun, and a quite a bit steeper. Crossing and following the rivers up to the ravine was stunning and an adventure. We reached the ravine, stopped for lunch, and up the steep part we went. This was no hike, this was rock climbing. My slight fear of heights was tested to the maximum, and Soph and Justin took the courageous spots of safely guiding me and Eli up the dodgy path (if you can call yellow arrows painted on rock faces a path).

 

Huntington Ravine

      Terrifying, yet so incredibly thrilling.

The views were worth it. This time climbing Washington I could see out and I was breathless, possibly both by fear and the beauty of the view each time we reached a flat spot or that I would glance over my shoulder. It wasn’t until I got home and did some quick reading that I found out what I had done that day was the steepest, most challenging, and most dangerous hike in all of the White Mountains. I am awfully proud of myself, but owe a lot of that to the amazing climbing buddies I had to get me through it.

Mt. Washington View

      (photo cred to Justin for this one, as well as the previous two.)

After we climbed down the mountain and got back to the White House, we realized how hungry we were, but lacked much energy to do any cooking and we jumped in the car. We headed for Moat mountain (a townie bar it seemed). And found the family style BBQ on the menu. All you can eat BBQ. It was too good, we all ate past the point of being full and Justin ate abou 3 times his weight in brisket.

FoodFood2

     With a good amount of reorganization, we were able to fit all the plates on our table.

 

Sunday morning: Soph and Justin must’ve gotten up early because when I reached the White House they had already stared cooking up a perfect mountain breakfast. As if we didn’t eat enough the night before, we had a lovely assortment of berry and banana pancakes, eggs, toast, bacon, and fresh berries.

Berry

       Breakfast of champions (the Huntington’s Ravine champions that is)

Later on, we went out berry picking for eating or jam making. The day had started out rainy, but we were happy to see it clear up since the little time we have left here should not be spent cooped up indoors. We went along the tracks until we got just past the slab and closed our weekend with a swim in the Saco and some swings off the rope. I am not ready for this summer to end and this Midwestern girl is not ready to say goodbye to these magnificent mountains.

 

RR Tracks

It’s going to be a very hard goodbye

~Hannah

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